Professional Essays Writer Henkel: Building a Winning Culture

Robert L. Simons, Natalie Kindred

Finance & Accounting

This case illustrates a CEO-led organizational transformation driven by stretch goals, performance measurement , and accountability. When Kasper Rorsted became CEO of Henkel, a Germany-based producer of personal care, laundry, and adhesives products, in 2008, he was determined to transform a corporate culture of “good enough” into one singularly focused on winning in a competitive marketplace. Historically, Henkel was a comfortable, stable place to work. Many employees never received negative performance feedback. Seeking to overturn a pervasive attitude of complacency, Rorsted implemented a multi-step change initiative aimed at building a “winning culture.” First, in November 2008, he announced a set of ambitious financial targets for 2012. As financial turmoil roiled the global economy, he reaffirmed his commitment to these targets, sending a clear signal to Henkel employees and external stakeholders that excuses were no longer acceptable. Rorsted next introduced a new set of five company values-replacing the previous list of 10 values, which few employees could recite by memory-the first of which emphasized a focus on customers. He also instituted a new, simplified performance management system, which rated managers’ performance and advancement potential on a four-point scale. The system also included a forced ranking requirement, mandating that a defined percentage of employees (in each business unit and company-wide) be ranked as top, strong, moderate, or low performers. These ratings significantly impacted managers’ bonus compensation. In late 2011-the time in which the case takes place-Henkel is well on its way to achieving its 2012 targets. Having shed nearly half its top management team, along with numerous product sites and brands, Henkel appears to be a leaner, more competitive, “winning” organization.

Change management, Collaboration, Executive compensation, Financial analysis, Organizational culture, Performance measurement, Personnel policies, Social responsibility, Strategy execution, Work-life balance

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Professional Essays Writer Intermountain Health Care

Richard Bohmer, Amy C. Edmondson, Laura R. Feldman

Technology & Operations

Intermountain Health Care (IHC), an integrated delivery system based in Utah, has adopted a new strategy for managing health care delivery. The approach focuses management attention not only on the facilities where care takes place but also on physician decision making and the care process itself, with the aim of boosting physician productivity and improving care quality, while saving money. This case explores the challenges facing Brent James, executive director of the Institute for Health Care Delivery Research at IHC, as he implements new structures and systems (including a data warehouse for care outcomes, electronic patient records, computer workstations, clinical data support systems, and protocols for care) designed to support clinical process management across a geographically diverse group of physicians with varying levels of interest and dedication to IHC. Also highlights an innovative strategy for creating and disseminating knowledge at the individual and organizational levels to maintain high standards in care delivery.

Collaboration, Disruptive innovation, IT, Organizational structure, Social responsibility, Strategy execution

Professional Essays Writer Lehman Brothers (A): Rise of the Equity Research Department

Ashish Nanda, Boris Groysberg, Lauren Prusiner

Leadership & Managing People

Under Jack Rivkin’s leadership, Shearson Lehman’s research department rose from relative obscurity to the highest ranking research department on Wall Street within three years. When Rivkin is promoted to head of equity, he wonders how to succeed in his new position. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

Human resource management , Leadership, Strategy execution

Professional Essays Writer A.P. Moller – Maersk Group: Evaluating Strategic Talent Management Initiatives

Boris Groysberg, Sarah L. Abbott

Leadership & Managing People

In 2012, Bill Allen and Maria Pejter, of Maersk Group’s Human Resources Department, sat down to consider some key aspects of Maersk’s talent management strategy. Headquartered in Copenhagen, Maersk was a global conglomerate with large shipping and oil & gas businesses. Among the talent management issues being discussed: an increase an employee turnover; internal training and development programs; hiring experienced talent from outside the firm; rehiring former employees (“boomerangs”); and increasing employee diversity.

Collaboration, Developing employees, Diversity, Employee retention, Hiring, Organizational structure, Risk management, Strategy execution, Talent management

Professional Essays Writer Tesla Motors

Eric J. Van Den Steen

Strategy & Execution

To maximize their effectiveness, color cases should be printed in color.In mid-2013, Tesla Motors was riding a wave of success: It had launched its first really mass-produced car-the model S-to rave reviews; had recently raised first-year production targets; and had started taking orders for its next car, the Model X. Tesla seemed to be on its way to defying the skeptics and becoming the first US company to enter the car industry with a mass-produced car since WWII and the first to successfully launch a fully electric car. Or was it not?

Economics, Innovation, Marketing, Organizational culture, Strategy execution

Professional Essays Writer Trader Joe’s

David L. Ager, Michael A. Roberto

Strategy & Execution

Based on a variety of metrics, Trader Joe’s ranked as one of the most successful grocers in the United States in 2013. Experts estimated that the company had the highest sales per square foot of any major grocery chain, even significantly higher than top performer Whole Foods. In 2013, Trader Joe’s faced several threats as larger chains such as Wal-Mart and Tesco had begun to open small-format stores that mimicked the Trader Joe’s approach. In addition some analysts had begun to question whether Trader’s Joe’s was losing its authenticity and “quirky cool” as the firm had continued to grow and expand across the country. What should Trader Joe’s do to ensure continued growth?

Economics, Growth strategy, Marketing, Organizational culture, Strategy execution

Professional Essays Writer Walt Disney Co.: The Entertainment King

Michael G. Rukstad, David J. Collis, Tyrrell Levine

Strategy & Execution

The first ten pages of the case ‘Walt Disney Co.: The Entertainment King’ are comprised of the company’s history, from 1923 to 2001. The Walt years are described, as is the company’s decline after his death and its resurgence under Eisner. The last five pages are devoted to Eisner’s strategic challenges in 2001: managing synergy, managing the brand, and managing creativity. Students are asked to think about the keys to Disney’s mid-1980s turnaround, about the proper boundaries of the firm, and about what Disney’s strategy should be beyond 2001.

Change management, Creativity, Risk management, Strategy execution