Professional Essays Writer Amazon in 2016

Sunil Gupta

Sales & Marketing

By 2015, Amazon had become one of the world’s largest e-commerce players with nearly $90 billion in annual sales. Although its profitability had been uneven in the 20 years since its inception, its stock price had risen almost 24,000% since the company went public. During this time Amazon has spread its business across a variety of products and services that some see as unrelated. Was Amazon spreading itself too thin or were its investments positioning the company for the future?

Marketing, Technology

Professional Essays Writer Digital Microscopy at Carl Zeiss: Managing Disruption

Willy Shih

Strategy & Execution

Ulrich Simon, the head of the Microscopy business group at Carl Zeiss AG knew that his unit was facing a disruptive threat, so he chartered a special team to tackle the industrial segment. Given a high degree of autonomy, the project team developed an understanding of the marketplace challenge and proceeded to develop and execute on a new business plan. Simon gave the team ample freedom to develop new processes and priorities appropriate to the market segment needs, but he couldn’t help but wonder whether it would continue as a stand-alone unit or he would need to reintegrate it into the mainline business. He also was nervous about the plan itself. The team had established timelines and milestones, but now they had to execute and deliver thjeir first product next year.

Disruptive innovation, Marketing, Product development, Supply chain, Technology

Professional Essays Writer Dropbox: ‘It Just Works’

Thomas R. Eisenmann, Michael Pao, Lauren Barley

Innovation & Entrepreneurship

Dropbox is a venture-backed Silicon Valley startup, founded in 2006, that provides online storage and backup services to millions of customers using a “freemium” (free + premium offers) business model. The case recounts Dropbox’s history from conception through mid-2010, when founder/CEO Drew Houston must make strategic decisions about new product features, how to target enterprise customers, and whether to pursue distribution deals with smartphone manufacturers.

Entrepreneurship, Growth strategy, Internet, Marketing, Product development

Professional Essays Writer Amazon.com, 2016

John R. Wells, Galen Danskin, Gabriel Ellsworth

Strategy & Execution

On January 28, 2016, Amazon announced record 2015 operating profits of $2.2 billion on $107 billion of sales, and the markets responded with cautious optimism. For years, founder and CEO Jeffrey Bezos had prioritized growth and investment in new business areas over profits, but pressure from analysts was mounting as growth was slowing and profits were failing to materialize. In 2014, Amazon had recorded a net loss of $241 million on revenues of $89 billion, in stark contrast to China’s leading Internet player Alibaba, which reported $3.9 billion of net income on revenue of $12.3 billion. While Alibaba was a third-party marketplace with no distribution or inventory holding, Amazon’s business model was more diverse. Amazon was primarily an online retail department store, offering a wide range of product categories, but it also maintained a significant third-party marketplace where it offered shipping, customer service, payment processing, and return services to independent retailers. Amazon also offered software and cloud storage services, online video streaming, and its own line of electronic hardware (mobile, e-reader, and smart television products). In addition, Amazon published books, hosted its own app store, funded video content development, and operated Amazon Prime, an annual membership program with a wide range of benefits. Indeed, Amazon’s activities overlapped with those of Apple, Google, eBay, Alibaba, and many other companies. Amazon provided little information on the profitability of its lines of business, many of which were believed to be unprofitable. Which businesses would drive Amazon’s future growth? Would the investments Amazon was making in market share eventually translate into profits? Or would another major competitor or business model replace Amazon? On a visit to the United States in June 2015, Jack Ma, chairman of Alibaba, stated, “We’re not coming here to compete.” Could Amazon or its investors afford to believe him?

Business models, Business processes, Competition, Data, Financial management, Growth strategy, Human resource management , International business, Internet, IT, Marketing, Mobile, Policy, Professional transitions, Workspaces

Professional Essays Writer Sephora Direct: Investing in Social Media, Video, and Mobile

Elie Ofek, Alison Berkley Wagonfeld

Sales & Marketing

Julie Bornstein, senior vice president of Sephora Direct, is seeking to double her budget for social media and other digital marketing initiatives for 2011. A number of digital efforts implemented in the past two years seem to be bearing fruit, and there is a desire to intensify Sephora’s social media, online video, and mobile presence. Bornstein must justify the need for the additional funding, determine how best to allocate the money across the various platforms, and establish effective ways to measure return on investment (ROI) for digital marketing spending . She must also take into account that the funding requested will likely come at the expense of Sephora’s traditional marketing programs. Importantly, Bornstein needs to begin thinking about a cohesive long-term strategy that clearly identifies the role digital platforms play and how they help Sephora maintain its leadership position in the prestige beauty care space. The constant emergence of new players, such as Groupon and Shop Socially, the growing power of social media platforms such as Facebook, and the way consumer behavior and user generated content are rapidly evolving in a digital era, make her task all the more challenging.

Communication, Government, Marketing

Professional Essays Writer Natureview Farm

Karen Martinsen Fleming

Sales & Marketing

When students have the English-language PDF of this Brief Case in a coursepack, they will also have the option to purchase an audio version.Explores channel management issues in the U.S. food industry. Natureview Farm, a Vermont-based producer of organic yogurt with $13 million in revenues, is the leading national yogurt brand (24% market share) sold into natural foods stores. It has achieved this through its special yogurt manufacturing process and through cultivating personal relationships with dairy buyers in the natural foods channel. Set in 2000, when the company faces financial pressure to grow revenues to $20 million by the end of 2001 due to a planned exit by its venture capital investors. The immediate decision point that the protagonist, Natureview’s vice president of marketing, faces is whether to achieve this revenue growth by expanding into the supermarket channel.

Budgeting, Marketing, Pricing, Supply chain

Professional Essays Writer Airbnb, Etsy, Uber: Acquiring the First Thousand Customers

Thales S. Teixeira, Morgan Brown

Sales & Marketing

By 2016, two-sided online platforms (or marketplaces) were pervasive among the highest growing internet startups around. These marketplaces sought to match suppliers of assets for rent, physical products or services with customers demanding them. Among the most notable two-sided platforms in terms of their tremendous early growth were Airbnb, Etsy and Uber. They offered short-term property rentals, handcrafted goods, and car rides, respectively. As two-sided markets grew to scale, network effects kicked in as more consumers bred more suppliers and vice versa. But how did these platforms acquire their first customers, at the time when they had so few providers? How exactly did they go about acquiring their first thousand customers?

IT, Marketing

Professional Essays Writer MOD Pizza: A Winning Recipe?

Boris Groysberg, John D. Vaughan, Matthew Preble

Leadership & Managing People

Scott and Ally Svenson, the founders of MOD Pizza, had to make a number of decisions in planning how to scale their small company. They wanted to grow MOD from 45 stores as of May 2015 to 200 stores by the end of 2016, and while the two believed that MOD could manage this growth from an operational standpoint, they wanted to make sure that MOD’s culture was sufficiently strong to survive this rollout. The company had developed a strong culture, and the Svensons did not want MOD’s core values and philosophies to be compromised as it rapidly expanded. To that end, they considered what the company needed to do in order to protect its core culture. Should it put rigid safeguards in place or trust that MOD could successfully scale its culture by hiring the right people and helping them develop as employees? The Svensons also discussed the possibility of an IPO at some point in the near future; what would this mean for its ability to stay true to its core values?

Entrepreneurship, Growth strategy, Labor, Leadership, Managing people, Marketing, Organizational culture, Social responsibility, Supply chain

Professional Essays Writer Google Inc. in 2014

Benjamin Edelman, Thomas R. Eisenmann

Strategy & Execution

The case ‘Google Inc. in 2014’ describes Google’s history, business model, governance structure, corporate culture, and processes for managing innovation. Reviews Google’s recent strategic initiatives and the threats they pose to selected competitors. Asks what Google should do next.

Competition, Economics, Internet, IT, Marketing