Professional Essays Writer Paul Levy: Taking Charge of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (A)

David A. Garvin, Michael A. Roberto

Leadership & Managing People

On January 7, 2002, Paul Levy became CEO of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a troubled organization, in serious financial difficulty. This case describes the situation Levy inherited, his negotiations prior to taking the job, and his first six months as CEO.

Communication, Corporate governance, Decision making, Leadership, Managing people

Advertisements

Professional Essays Writer Levendary Cafe: The China Challenge

Christopher A. Bartlett, Arar Han

Global Business

Winner of a 2013 ecch Case AwardJust weeks into her new job, Mia Foster, a first time CEO with no international management experience, is faced with a major challenge at Levendary Café, a $10 billion US-based fast food chain. Strategically, many of her corporate staff have become concerned that the company’s major expansion into China is moving too far from Levendary’s well-defined concepts of store design and menu. Organizationally, Foster has been frustrated by the apparent unwillingness of Louis Chen, president of Levendary China, to conform to the company’s planning and reporting processes. Meanwhile, financial evidence shows that Chen’s efforts have produced strong results and suggests that he knows China far better than U.S headquarters does. The entrepreneurial Chen has resisted attempts by Foster and others to discuss corporate plans for China. As Foster flies to China to meet with Chen she faces a decision that will determine the future of Levendary China and perhaps the entire globalization effort: can she manage Chen at all, and if so, how?

Entrepreneurship, Globalization, Managing people, Strategic planning

Professional Essays Writer Honda (B)

Evelyn T. Christiansen, Richard Tanner Pascale

Strategy & Execution

Describes the history of Honda Motor Company from its beginning through its entry into and subsequent dominance of the U.S. market as seen through the eyes of Honda executives. The history of Honda’s successful entry into the U.S. market is viewed as highly adaptive and fraught with error and serendipity. Honda (A) and (B) are designed to be used together to contrast two differing views of major events in a company’s history, both of which are important for a general manager to understand.

Change management, Competitive strategy, Corporate governance, Managing people

Professional Essays Writer MOD Pizza: A Winning Recipe?

Boris Groysberg, John D. Vaughan, Matthew Preble

Leadership & Managing People

Scott and Ally Svenson, the founders of MOD Pizza, had to make a number of decisions in planning how to scale their small company. They wanted to grow MOD from 45 stores as of May 2015 to 200 stores by the end of 2016, and while the two believed that MOD could manage this growth from an operational standpoint, they wanted to make sure that MOD’s culture was sufficiently strong to survive this rollout. The company had developed a strong culture, and the Svensons did not want MOD’s core values and philosophies to be compromised as it rapidly expanded. To that end, they considered what the company needed to do in order to protect its core culture. Should it put rigid safeguards in place or trust that MOD could successfully scale its culture by hiring the right people and helping them develop as employees? The Svensons also discussed the possibility of an IPO at some point in the near future; what would this mean for its ability to stay true to its core values?

Entrepreneurship, Growth strategy, Labor, Leadership, Managing people, Marketing, Organizational culture, Social responsibility, Supply chain

Professional Essays Writer Amazon as an Employer

Jyotsna Bhatnagar, Shweta Jaiswal

Leadership & Managing People

Amazon was the biggest Internet-based retailer in the United States and had frequently been featured on lists of the most admired companies. In 2015, The New York Times published an article that portrayed Amazon as a ruthless employer with brutal human resource management practices and a toxic work atmosphere. Employees were divided in their opinions: some found the culture invigorating and others found it hard to survive in. Leaders in the industry came to Amazon’s defence, while employees at other organizations began to disclose their own experiences of toxic work environments. Could Amazon continue to grow, thrive, and retain employees if it maintained its current employee management strategy? Did stress foster innovation, and, if so, at what point did that stress become destructive?

Entrepreneurship, Innovation, Leadership, Managing people, Organizational culture, Public relations