Professional Essays Writer Cleveland Clinic: Transformation and Growth 2015

Michael E. Porter, Elizabeth Olmsted Teisberg

Strategy & Execution

The Cleveland Clinic’s health care services are internationally renowned for quality. In 2008, The Clinic began to restructure the organization into teams defined around patient needs, rather than traditional medical specialties.”Patients First! takes shape as the teams measure and report outcomes, coordinate care, and develop to support improving value for patients. In addition to restructuring care delivery in the hospitals and throughout northeastern Ohio, The Clinic has investments, facilities, and staff in several other states in the U.S. as well as in Canada and Abu Dhabi. Now in 2015, as the Clinic’s domestic and international footprint continues to expand, its leadership is also focused in maintaining the Cleveland Clinic brand and providing optimal clinical care. Students can explore strategy transformation, geographic expansion, the process of introducing new measurement approaches, alignment of activities with strategic goals, and issues in leading change both within a company and across an economic sector.

Growth strategy, Health, Leadership, Performance measurement, Personnel policies

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Professional Essays Writer Dropbox: ‘It Just Works’

Thomas R. Eisenmann, Michael Pao, Lauren Barley

Innovation & Entrepreneurship

Dropbox is a venture-backed Silicon Valley startup, founded in 2006, that provides online storage and backup services to millions of customers using a “freemium” (free + premium offers) business model. The case recounts Dropbox’s history from conception through mid-2010, when founder/CEO Drew Houston must make strategic decisions about new product features, how to target enterprise customers, and whether to pursue distribution deals with smartphone manufacturers.

Entrepreneurship, Growth strategy, Internet, Marketing, Product development

Professional Essays Writer Amazon.com, 2016

John R. Wells, Galen Danskin, Gabriel Ellsworth

Strategy & Execution

On January 28, 2016, Amazon announced record 2015 operating profits of $2.2 billion on $107 billion of sales, and the markets responded with cautious optimism. For years, founder and CEO Jeffrey Bezos had prioritized growth and investment in new business areas over profits, but pressure from analysts was mounting as growth was slowing and profits were failing to materialize. In 2014, Amazon had recorded a net loss of $241 million on revenues of $89 billion, in stark contrast to China’s leading Internet player Alibaba, which reported $3.9 billion of net income on revenue of $12.3 billion. While Alibaba was a third-party marketplace with no distribution or inventory holding, Amazon’s business model was more diverse. Amazon was primarily an online retail department store, offering a wide range of product categories, but it also maintained a significant third-party marketplace where it offered shipping, customer service, payment processing, and return services to independent retailers. Amazon also offered software and cloud storage services, online video streaming, and its own line of electronic hardware (mobile, e-reader, and smart television products). In addition, Amazon published books, hosted its own app store, funded video content development, and operated Amazon Prime, an annual membership program with a wide range of benefits. Indeed, Amazon’s activities overlapped with those of Apple, Google, eBay, Alibaba, and many other companies. Amazon provided little information on the profitability of its lines of business, many of which were believed to be unprofitable. Which businesses would drive Amazon’s future growth? Would the investments Amazon was making in market share eventually translate into profits? Or would another major competitor or business model replace Amazon? On a visit to the United States in June 2015, Jack Ma, chairman of Alibaba, stated, “We’re not coming here to compete.” Could Amazon or its investors afford to believe him?

Business models, Business processes, Competition, Data, Financial management, Growth strategy, Human resource management , International business, Internet, IT, Marketing, Mobile, Policy, Professional transitions, Workspaces

Professional Essays Writer MOD Pizza: A Winning Recipe?

Boris Groysberg, John D. Vaughan, Matthew Preble

Leadership & Managing People

Scott and Ally Svenson, the founders of MOD Pizza, had to make a number of decisions in planning how to scale their small company. They wanted to grow MOD from 45 stores as of May 2015 to 200 stores by the end of 2016, and while the two believed that MOD could manage this growth from an operational standpoint, they wanted to make sure that MOD’s culture was sufficiently strong to survive this rollout. The company had developed a strong culture, and the Svensons did not want MOD’s core values and philosophies to be compromised as it rapidly expanded. To that end, they considered what the company needed to do in order to protect its core culture. Should it put rigid safeguards in place or trust that MOD could successfully scale its culture by hiring the right people and helping them develop as employees? The Svensons also discussed the possibility of an IPO at some point in the near future; what would this mean for its ability to stay true to its core values?

Entrepreneurship, Growth strategy, Labor, Leadership, Managing people, Marketing, Organizational culture, Social responsibility, Supply chain

Professional Essays Writer HubSpot: Inbound Marketing and Web 2.0

Thomas Steenburgh, Jill Avery, Naseem Dahod

Sales & Marketing

Winner of the 2014 Case Centre Award in the category of Marketing.The case ‘HubSpot: Inbound Marketing and Web 2.0’ introduces the concept of inbound marketing, pulling customer prospects toward a business through the use of Web 2.0 tools and applications like blogging, search engine optimization, and social media. Students follow the growth of HubSpot, an entrepreneurial venture which, in its quest for growth, faces significant challenges including: developing market segmentation and targeting strategies to decide which customer to serve and which to turn away, configuring pricing strategies to align with the value delivery stream customers experience, and determining whether inbound marketing programs can generate enough scale or whether traditional outbound marketing methods need to be employed to accelerate growth.

Entrepreneurship, Growth strategy, Pricing, Social platforms

Professional Essays Writer Cambridge Consulting Group: Bob Anderson

Jay W. Lorsch, John J. Gabarro

Leadership & Managing People

Describes the situation facing the head of a rapidly growing industry-focused group within a consulting company. Highlights the dilemmas of being a “producing manager” (i.e., a professional who has both individual production as well as management responsibilities). Issues raised include: delegation, developing subordinates, developing an agenda, and building an organization.

Growth strategy, Leadership

Professional Essays Writer Trader Joe’s

David L. Ager, Michael A. Roberto

Strategy & Execution

Based on a variety of metrics, Trader Joe’s ranked as one of the most successful grocers in the United States in 2013. Experts estimated that the company had the highest sales per square foot of any major grocery chain, even significantly higher than top performer Whole Foods. In 2013, Trader Joe’s faced several threats as larger chains such as Wal-Mart and Tesco had begun to open small-format stores that mimicked the Trader Joe’s approach. In addition some analysts had begun to question whether Trader’s Joe’s was losing its authenticity and “quirky cool” as the firm had continued to grow and expand across the country. What should Trader Joe’s do to ensure continued growth?

Economics, Growth strategy, Marketing, Organizational culture, Strategy execution

Professional Essays Writer Zipcar: Refining the Business Model

Myra M. Hart, Michael J. Roberts, Julia D. Stevens

Innovation & Entrepreneurship

This case is accompanied by a Video Short that can be shown in class or included in a digital coursepack. Instructors should consider the timing of making the video available to students, as it may reveal key case details.Zipcar is a start-up organized around the idea of “sharing” car usage via a membership organization. This case describes several iterations of the Zipcar business model and financial plan. These iterations include a very early version and a version developed just prior to the launch of the business, as well as data from the first few months of operations. Students are called on to analyze the underlying economics and business model for the venture and to discover how these assumptions are holding up as the business is actually rolled out.

Business models, Costs, Entrepreneurship, Gender, Growth strategy, Strategic planning, Technology

Professional Essays Writer Netflix in 2011

Willy Shih, Stephen P. Kaufman

Strategy & Execution

Reed Hastings founded Netflix to provide a home movie service that would do a better job satisfying customers than the traditional retail rental model. But as it encountered challenges it underwent several major strategy shifts, ultimately developing a business model and an operational strategy that were highly disruptive to retail video rental chains. The combination of a large national inventory, a recommendation system that drove viewership across a broad catalog, and a large customer base made Netflix a force to be reckoned with, especially as a distribution channel for lower-profile and independent films. Blockbuster, the nation’s largest retail video rental firm, was initially slow to respond, but ultimately rolled out a hybrid retail/online response in the form of Blockbuster Online. Aggressive pricing pulled in subscribers, but at a price to both it and Netflix. But a new challenge was on the horizon – the rapid growth of the company’s online streaming service, which had a very different business model. Hastings’ efforts to separate the activity into two separate companies met with strong pushback from consumers and the press. What was the best path forward?

Disruptive innovation, Growth strategy, Operations management, Technology

Professional Essays Writer IKEA’s Global Sourcing Challenge: Indian Rugs and Child Labor (A)

Christopher A. Bartlett, Vincent Dessain, Anders Sjoman

Technology & Operations

Traces the history of IKEA’s response to a TV report that its Indian carpet suppliers were using child labor. Describes IKEA’s growth, including the importance of a sourcing strategy based on its close relationships with suppliers in developing countries. Details the development of IKEA’s strong culture and values that include a commitment “to create a better everyday life for many people.” Describes how, in response to regulatory and public pressure, IKEA developed a set of environmental policies that grew to encompass a relationship with Greenpeace and WWF on forest management and conservation. Then, in 1994, Marianne Barner, a newly appointed IKEA product manager, is surprised by a Swedish television documentary on the use of child labor by Indian carpet suppliers, including some that supply IKEA’s rugs. She immediately implements a strict policy that provides for contract cancellation if any IKEA supplier uses child labor. Then Barner is confronted by a German TV producer who advises her that he is about to broadcast an investigative program documenting the use of child labor in one of the company’s major suppliers. How should she react to the crisis? How should the company deal with the ongoing issue of child labor in the supply chain ?

Cross-cultural management, Emerging markets, Ethics, Growth strategy, Human resource management , Operations management, Public relations, Social enterprise, Social responsibility