Professional Essays Writer Amazon.com, 2016

John R. Wells, Galen Danskin, Gabriel Ellsworth

Strategy & Execution

On January 28, 2016, Amazon announced record 2015 operating profits of $2.2 billion on $107 billion of sales, and the markets responded with cautious optimism. For years, founder and CEO Jeffrey Bezos had prioritized growth and investment in new business areas over profits, but pressure from analysts was mounting as growth was slowing and profits were failing to materialize. In 2014, Amazon had recorded a net loss of $241 million on revenues of $89 billion, in stark contrast to China’s leading Internet player Alibaba, which reported $3.9 billion of net income on revenue of $12.3 billion. While Alibaba was a third-party marketplace with no distribution or inventory holding, Amazon’s business model was more diverse. Amazon was primarily an online retail department store, offering a wide range of product categories, but it also maintained a significant third-party marketplace where it offered shipping, customer service, payment processing, and return services to independent retailers. Amazon also offered software and cloud storage services, online video streaming, and its own line of electronic hardware (mobile, e-reader, and smart television products). In addition, Amazon published books, hosted its own app store, funded video content development, and operated Amazon Prime, an annual membership program with a wide range of benefits. Indeed, Amazon’s activities overlapped with those of Apple, Google, eBay, Alibaba, and many other companies. Amazon provided little information on the profitability of its lines of business, many of which were believed to be unprofitable. Which businesses would drive Amazon’s future growth? Would the investments Amazon was making in market share eventually translate into profits? Or would another major competitor or business model replace Amazon? On a visit to the United States in June 2015, Jack Ma, chairman of Alibaba, stated, “We’re not coming here to compete.” Could Amazon or its investors afford to believe him?

Business models, Business processes, Competition, Data, Financial management, Growth strategy, Human resource management , International business, Internet, IT, Marketing, Mobile, Policy, Professional transitions, Workspaces

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Professional Essays Writer HBR’s 10 Must Reads 2017: The Definitive Management Ideas of the Year from Harvard Business Review

Harvard Business Review, Clayton M. Christensen, Adam M. Grant, Vijay Govindarajan

Leadership & Managing People

A year’s worth of management wisdom, all in one place. We’ve reviewed the ideas, insights, and best practices from the past year of Harvard Business Review to keep you up-to-date on the most cutting-edge, influential thinking driving business today. With authors from Clayton M. Christensen to Adam Grant and company examples from Intel to Uber, this volume brings the most current and important management conversations to your fingertips. This book will inspire you to: Rethink the way you work in the face of advancing automation; Transform your business using a platform strategy; Apply design thinking to create innovative products; Identify where too much collaboration may be holding your people back; See the theory of disruptive innovation in a brand new light; Recognize the signs that your cross-cultural negotiation may be falling apart. This collection of articles includes “Collaborative Overload,” by Rob Cross, Reb Rebele, and Adam Grant; “Algorithms Need Managers, Too,” by Michael Luca, Jon Kleinberg, and Sendhil Mullainathan; “Pipelines, Platforms, and the New Rules of Strategy,” by Marshall W. Van Alstyne, Geoffrey G. Parker, and Sangeet Paul Choudary; “What Is Disruptive Innovation?,” by Clayton M. Christensen, Michael Raynor, and Rory McDonald; “How Indra Nooyi Turned Design Thinking into Strategy,” an interview with Indra Nooyi by Adi Ignatius; “Engineering Reverse Innovations,” by Amos Winter and Vijay Govindarajan; “The Employer-Led Health Care Revolution,” by Patricia A. McDonald, Robert S. Mecklenburg, and Lindsay A. Martin; “Getting to Si, Ja, Oui, Hai, and Da,” by Erin Meyer; “The Limits of Empathy,” by Adam Waytz; “People Before Strategy: A New Role for the CHRO,” by Ram Charan, Dominic Barton, and Dennis Carey; and “Beyond Automation,” by Thomas H. Davenport and Julia Kirby.

Change management, Collaboration, Communication, Competition, Data, Disruptive innovation, Health, IT, Marketing, Negotiations, Organizational structure, Psychology, Talent management