Professional Essays Writer Henkel: Building a Winning Culture

Robert L. Simons, Natalie Kindred

Finance & Accounting

This case illustrates a CEO-led organizational transformation driven by stretch goals, performance measurement , and accountability. When Kasper Rorsted became CEO of Henkel, a Germany-based producer of personal care, laundry, and adhesives products, in 2008, he was determined to transform a corporate culture of “good enough” into one singularly focused on winning in a competitive marketplace. Historically, Henkel was a comfortable, stable place to work. Many employees never received negative performance feedback. Seeking to overturn a pervasive attitude of complacency, Rorsted implemented a multi-step change initiative aimed at building a “winning culture.” First, in November 2008, he announced a set of ambitious financial targets for 2012. As financial turmoil roiled the global economy, he reaffirmed his commitment to these targets, sending a clear signal to Henkel employees and external stakeholders that excuses were no longer acceptable. Rorsted next introduced a new set of five company values-replacing the previous list of 10 values, which few employees could recite by memory-the first of which emphasized a focus on customers. He also instituted a new, simplified performance management system, which rated managers’ performance and advancement potential on a four-point scale. The system also included a forced ranking requirement, mandating that a defined percentage of employees (in each business unit and company-wide) be ranked as top, strong, moderate, or low performers. These ratings significantly impacted managers’ bonus compensation. In late 2011-the time in which the case takes place-Henkel is well on its way to achieving its 2012 targets. Having shed nearly half its top management team, along with numerous product sites and brands, Henkel appears to be a leaner, more competitive, “winning” organization.

Change management, Collaboration, Executive compensation, Financial analysis, Organizational culture, Performance measurement, Personnel policies, Social responsibility, Strategy execution, Work-life balance

Professional Essays Writer Intermountain Health Care

Richard Bohmer, Amy C. Edmondson, Laura R. Feldman

Technology & Operations

Intermountain Health Care (IHC), an integrated delivery system based in Utah, has adopted a new strategy for managing health care delivery. The approach focuses management attention not only on the facilities where care takes place but also on physician decision making and the care process itself, with the aim of boosting physician productivity and improving care quality, while saving money. This case explores the challenges facing Brent James, executive director of the Institute for Health Care Delivery Research at IHC, as he implements new structures and systems (including a data warehouse for care outcomes, electronic patient records, computer workstations, clinical data support systems, and protocols for care) designed to support clinical process management across a geographically diverse group of physicians with varying levels of interest and dedication to IHC. Also highlights an innovative strategy for creating and disseminating knowledge at the individual and organizational levels to maintain high standards in care delivery.

Collaboration, Disruptive innovation, IT, Organizational structure, Social responsibility, Strategy execution

Professional Essays Writer Henry Tam and the MGI Team

Jeffrey T. Polzer, Ingrid Vargas, Hillary Anger Elfenbein

Leadership & Managing People

Within a short time frame, seven diverse team members assemble to write a business plan for a new company and struggle to define their roles, make decisions together, and resolve conflict. Henry Tam, a second-year Harvard MBA student, who joins an aspiring start-up company and a fellow classmate to enter the school’s business plan contest. The founders of the company are two internationally accomplished musicians and a 1987 Harvard MBA, all Russian, who are trying to create, produce, and sell a unique computer-based music game. Conflict builds as the team generates a range of ideas about how to market their product, but has trouble agreeing on which ideas to pursue. Henry Tam wrestles with how to fix the problems that have hindered the team’s progress.

Collaboration, Communication, Conflict, Customers, Diversity, Entrepreneurship, IT, Leadership, Leading teams

Professional Essays Writer A.P. Moller – Maersk Group: Evaluating Strategic Talent Management Initiatives

Boris Groysberg, Sarah L. Abbott

Leadership & Managing People

In 2012, Bill Allen and Maria Pejter, of Maersk Group’s Human Resources Department, sat down to consider some key aspects of Maersk’s talent management strategy. Headquartered in Copenhagen, Maersk was a global conglomerate with large shipping and oil & gas businesses. Among the talent management issues being discussed: an increase an employee turnover; internal training and development programs; hiring experienced talent from outside the firm; rehiring former employees (“boomerangs”); and increasing employee diversity.

Collaboration, Developing employees, Diversity, Employee retention, Hiring, Organizational structure, Risk management, Strategy execution, Talent management

Professional Essays Writer Jeanette Clough at Mount Auburn Hospital

Laura Morgan Roberts, Ayesha Kanji

Organizational Development

Jeanette Clough, the CEO of Mt. Auburn Hospital, successfully leads a turnaround for the struggling local hospital. When she assumed leadership of Mt. Auburn in 1998, the hospital had recently suffered a $10 million loss. During her first six months, several members of the senior leadership team quit. Clough successfully led this change effort through a transparent, collaborative approach that focused first and foremost on patient care. She was skilled at building trust and credibility with key constituents: the trustees, medical staff, and employees. After the first year, they reduced the losses to $5 million. In 2000, the hospital broke even. In 2004, the hospital earned a $7 million profit. The hospital is currently in the midst of a capital campaign to update the facilities and expand. Community groups are resisting the hospital expansion in Cambridge, posing a new set of challenges. Clough must also be clear about the strategic positioning of the hospital–a mixture of a community and teaching hospital. How can Mt. Auburn maintain this unique positioning without attempting to expand beyond its reach in competing with the other Boston-based teaching hospitals?

Collaboration, Influence, Leadership, Organizational culture

Professional Essays Writer HBR’s 10 Must Reads 2017: The Definitive Management Ideas of the Year from Harvard Business Review

Harvard Business Review, Clayton M. Christensen, Adam M. Grant, Vijay Govindarajan

Leadership & Managing People

A year’s worth of management wisdom, all in one place. We’ve reviewed the ideas, insights, and best practices from the past year of Harvard Business Review to keep you up-to-date on the most cutting-edge, influential thinking driving business today. With authors from Clayton M. Christensen to Adam Grant and company examples from Intel to Uber, this volume brings the most current and important management conversations to your fingertips. This book will inspire you to: Rethink the way you work in the face of advancing automation; Transform your business using a platform strategy; Apply design thinking to create innovative products; Identify where too much collaboration may be holding your people back; See the theory of disruptive innovation in a brand new light; Recognize the signs that your cross-cultural negotiation may be falling apart. This collection of articles includes “Collaborative Overload,” by Rob Cross, Reb Rebele, and Adam Grant; “Algorithms Need Managers, Too,” by Michael Luca, Jon Kleinberg, and Sendhil Mullainathan; “Pipelines, Platforms, and the New Rules of Strategy,” by Marshall W. Van Alstyne, Geoffrey G. Parker, and Sangeet Paul Choudary; “What Is Disruptive Innovation?,” by Clayton M. Christensen, Michael Raynor, and Rory McDonald; “How Indra Nooyi Turned Design Thinking into Strategy,” an interview with Indra Nooyi by Adi Ignatius; “Engineering Reverse Innovations,” by Amos Winter and Vijay Govindarajan; “The Employer-Led Health Care Revolution,” by Patricia A. McDonald, Robert S. Mecklenburg, and Lindsay A. Martin; “Getting to Si, Ja, Oui, Hai, and Da,” by Erin Meyer; “The Limits of Empathy,” by Adam Waytz; “People Before Strategy: A New Role for the CHRO,” by Ram Charan, Dominic Barton, and Dennis Carey; and “Beyond Automation,” by Thomas H. Davenport and Julia Kirby.

Change management, Collaboration, Communication, Competition, Data, Disruptive innovation, Health, IT, Marketing, Negotiations, Organizational structure, Psychology, Talent management