Professional Essays Writer Henkel: Building a Winning Culture

Robert L. Simons, Natalie Kindred

Finance & Accounting

This case illustrates a CEO-led organizational transformation driven by stretch goals, performance measurement , and accountability. When Kasper Rorsted became CEO of Henkel, a Germany-based producer of personal care, laundry, and adhesives products, in 2008, he was determined to transform a corporate culture of “good enough” into one singularly focused on winning in a competitive marketplace. Historically, Henkel was a comfortable, stable place to work. Many employees never received negative performance feedback. Seeking to overturn a pervasive attitude of complacency, Rorsted implemented a multi-step change initiative aimed at building a “winning culture.” First, in November 2008, he announced a set of ambitious financial targets for 2012. As financial turmoil roiled the global economy, he reaffirmed his commitment to these targets, sending a clear signal to Henkel employees and external stakeholders that excuses were no longer acceptable. Rorsted next introduced a new set of five company values-replacing the previous list of 10 values, which few employees could recite by memory-the first of which emphasized a focus on customers. He also instituted a new, simplified performance management system, which rated managers’ performance and advancement potential on a four-point scale. The system also included a forced ranking requirement, mandating that a defined percentage of employees (in each business unit and company-wide) be ranked as top, strong, moderate, or low performers. These ratings significantly impacted managers’ bonus compensation. In late 2011-the time in which the case takes place-Henkel is well on its way to achieving its 2012 targets. Having shed nearly half its top management team, along with numerous product sites and brands, Henkel appears to be a leaner, more competitive, “winning” organization.

Change management, Collaboration, Executive compensation, Financial analysis, Organizational culture, Performance measurement, Personnel policies, Social responsibility, Strategy execution, Work-life balance

Professional Essays Writer Disruption in Detroit: Ford, Silicon Valley, and Beyond

Ernest Gundling

Leadership & Managing People

This case focuses on the Ford Motor Company in Spring 2016 and how its current CEO, Mark Fields, and his senior management team should best respond to several emerging disruptive technologies that will ultimately force the automaker to modify its current business model. These disruptive technologies includes electric vehicles, connectivity autonomous vehicles, car ownership and use, and emergence of subcompact cars. Having experienced a successful financial turnaround under the leadership of its prior CEO, Alan Mulally, during and after the 2008-09 recession, Ford must now decide whether its current investment in responding to these new emerging technologies is too much, too little or just right. As Ford considers the degree of its response, it also faces new competitors in the fast-changing automotive landscape — besides its traditional automaker rivals like General Motors, Toyota and Hyundai — that now includes the Google, Apple and Tesla from the Silicon Valley as well as BYD and LeEco from China. Ford’s history of innovation in response to past opportunities and challenges during its history is also discussed.

Change management, Disruptive innovation, Leadership, Technology

Professional Essays Writer Honda (B)

Evelyn T. Christiansen, Richard Tanner Pascale

Strategy & Execution

Describes the history of Honda Motor Company from its beginning through its entry into and subsequent dominance of the U.S. market as seen through the eyes of Honda executives. The history of Honda’s successful entry into the U.S. market is viewed as highly adaptive and fraught with error and serendipity. Honda (A) and (B) are designed to be used together to contrast two differing views of major events in a company’s history, both of which are important for a general manager to understand.

Change management, Competitive strategy, Corporate governance, Managing people

Professional Essays Writer Walt Disney Co.: The Entertainment King

Michael G. Rukstad, David J. Collis, Tyrrell Levine

Strategy & Execution

The first ten pages of the case ‘Walt Disney Co.: The Entertainment King’ are comprised of the company’s history, from 1923 to 2001. The Walt years are described, as is the company’s decline after his death and its resurgence under Eisner. The last five pages are devoted to Eisner’s strategic challenges in 2001: managing synergy, managing the brand, and managing creativity. Students are asked to think about the keys to Disney’s mid-1980s turnaround, about the proper boundaries of the firm, and about what Disney’s strategy should be beyond 2001.

Change management, Creativity, Risk management, Strategy execution

Professional Essays Writer HBR’s 10 Must Reads 2017: The Definitive Management Ideas of the Year from Harvard Business Review

Harvard Business Review, Clayton M. Christensen, Adam M. Grant, Vijay Govindarajan

Leadership & Managing People

A year’s worth of management wisdom, all in one place. We’ve reviewed the ideas, insights, and best practices from the past year of Harvard Business Review to keep you up-to-date on the most cutting-edge, influential thinking driving business today. With authors from Clayton M. Christensen to Adam Grant and company examples from Intel to Uber, this volume brings the most current and important management conversations to your fingertips. This book will inspire you to: Rethink the way you work in the face of advancing automation; Transform your business using a platform strategy; Apply design thinking to create innovative products; Identify where too much collaboration may be holding your people back; See the theory of disruptive innovation in a brand new light; Recognize the signs that your cross-cultural negotiation may be falling apart. This collection of articles includes “Collaborative Overload,” by Rob Cross, Reb Rebele, and Adam Grant; “Algorithms Need Managers, Too,” by Michael Luca, Jon Kleinberg, and Sendhil Mullainathan; “Pipelines, Platforms, and the New Rules of Strategy,” by Marshall W. Van Alstyne, Geoffrey G. Parker, and Sangeet Paul Choudary; “What Is Disruptive Innovation?,” by Clayton M. Christensen, Michael Raynor, and Rory McDonald; “How Indra Nooyi Turned Design Thinking into Strategy,” an interview with Indra Nooyi by Adi Ignatius; “Engineering Reverse Innovations,” by Amos Winter and Vijay Govindarajan; “The Employer-Led Health Care Revolution,” by Patricia A. McDonald, Robert S. Mecklenburg, and Lindsay A. Martin; “Getting to Si, Ja, Oui, Hai, and Da,” by Erin Meyer; “The Limits of Empathy,” by Adam Waytz; “People Before Strategy: A New Role for the CHRO,” by Ram Charan, Dominic Barton, and Dennis Carey; and “Beyond Automation,” by Thomas H. Davenport and Julia Kirby.

Change management, Collaboration, Communication, Competition, Data, Disruptive innovation, Health, IT, Marketing, Negotiations, Organizational structure, Psychology, Talent management