Professional Essays Writer Comcast Corporation

Sunil Gupta, Henry McGee, Felix Oberholzer-Gee, Margaret Rodriguez

Strategy & Execution

In March 2015, the U.S. television industry received a major wake-up call. HBO, a premium cable channel with over 30 million subscribers, had announced it would begin offering a standalone streaming service. This new service would allow customers to bypass the cable companies and get direct access to HBO’s programming online. The announcement was followed closely by Brian Roberts, chief executive of the Comcast Corporation. Comcast was America’s largest cable and internet service provider, having built a profitable business bundling television content and delivering it via cable networks to more than 20 million households. Broadcast and cable television was a $173 billion industry in the U.S., but the rise of on-demand and streaming services meant viewers had more options than ever before. What did developments such as HBO’s new service mean for the future of Comcast, and for the industry overall?

Professional Essays Writer The Rise and Fall of Nokia

Juan Alcacer, Tarun Khanna, Christine Snively

Strategy & Execution

In 2013, Nokia sold its Device and Services business to Microsoft for €5.4 billion. For decades Nokia had led the telecommunications (telecom) industry in handsets and networking. By the late 2000s, however, Nokia’s position as market leader in mobile devices was threatened by competition from new lower-cost Asian manufacturers. Apple’s 2007 release of its iPhone established an entire new category-the smartphone-immediately popular with users. What were Nokia’s missteps over the years? What should Nokia have done differently?

Mobile, Strategy

Professional Essays Writer Cleveland Clinic: Transformation and Growth 2015

Michael E. Porter, Elizabeth Olmsted Teisberg

Strategy & Execution

The Cleveland Clinic’s health care services are internationally renowned for quality. In 2008, The Clinic began to restructure the organization into teams defined around patient needs, rather than traditional medical specialties.”Patients First! takes shape as the teams measure and report outcomes, coordinate care, and develop to support improving value for patients. In addition to restructuring care delivery in the hospitals and throughout northeastern Ohio, The Clinic has investments, facilities, and staff in several other states in the U.S. as well as in Canada and Abu Dhabi. Now in 2015, as the Clinic’s domestic and international footprint continues to expand, its leadership is also focused in maintaining the Cleveland Clinic brand and providing optimal clinical care. Students can explore strategy transformation, geographic expansion, the process of introducing new measurement approaches, alignment of activities with strategic goals, and issues in leading change both within a company and across an economic sector.

Growth strategy, Health, Leadership, Performance measurement, Personnel policies

Professional Essays Writer Digital Microscopy at Carl Zeiss: Managing Disruption

Willy Shih

Strategy & Execution

Ulrich Simon, the head of the Microscopy business group at Carl Zeiss AG knew that his unit was facing a disruptive threat, so he chartered a special team to tackle the industrial segment. Given a high degree of autonomy, the project team developed an understanding of the marketplace challenge and proceeded to develop and execute on a new business plan. Simon gave the team ample freedom to develop new processes and priorities appropriate to the market segment needs, but he couldn’t help but wonder whether it would continue as a stand-alone unit or he would need to reintegrate it into the mainline business. He also was nervous about the plan itself. The team had established timelines and milestones, but now they had to execute and deliver thjeir first product next year.

Disruptive innovation, Marketing, Product development, Supply chain, Technology

Professional Essays Writer Amazon.com, 2016

John R. Wells, Galen Danskin, Gabriel Ellsworth

Strategy & Execution

On January 28, 2016, Amazon announced record 2015 operating profits of $2.2 billion on $107 billion of sales, and the markets responded with cautious optimism. For years, founder and CEO Jeffrey Bezos had prioritized growth and investment in new business areas over profits, but pressure from analysts was mounting as growth was slowing and profits were failing to materialize. In 2014, Amazon had recorded a net loss of $241 million on revenues of $89 billion, in stark contrast to China’s leading Internet player Alibaba, which reported $3.9 billion of net income on revenue of $12.3 billion. While Alibaba was a third-party marketplace with no distribution or inventory holding, Amazon’s business model was more diverse. Amazon was primarily an online retail department store, offering a wide range of product categories, but it also maintained a significant third-party marketplace where it offered shipping, customer service, payment processing, and return services to independent retailers. Amazon also offered software and cloud storage services, online video streaming, and its own line of electronic hardware (mobile, e-reader, and smart television products). In addition, Amazon published books, hosted its own app store, funded video content development, and operated Amazon Prime, an annual membership program with a wide range of benefits. Indeed, Amazon’s activities overlapped with those of Apple, Google, eBay, Alibaba, and many other companies. Amazon provided little information on the profitability of its lines of business, many of which were believed to be unprofitable. Which businesses would drive Amazon’s future growth? Would the investments Amazon was making in market share eventually translate into profits? Or would another major competitor or business model replace Amazon? On a visit to the United States in June 2015, Jack Ma, chairman of Alibaba, stated, “We’re not coming here to compete.” Could Amazon or its investors afford to believe him?

Business models, Business processes, Competition, Data, Financial management, Growth strategy, Human resource management , International business, Internet, IT, Marketing, Mobile, Policy, Professional transitions, Workspaces

Professional Essays Writer The Walt Disney Company and Pixar, Inc.: To Acquire or Not to Acquire?

Juan Alcacer, David J. Collis, Mary Furey

Strategy & Execution

Soon after Robert Iger took over as CEO of the Walt Disney Company in late 2005, he turned his attention toward Pixar, the animation studio with which Disney had worked since 1991 and was responsible for producing hits such as Toy Story and Finding Nemo. Disney’s own animated film business had been in decline since Jeffrey Katzenberg left to establish rival studio Dreamworks and the business relied on revenue from its partnership with Pixar to maintain performance. With the Co- Production Agreement between the two studios coming to a close in 2006, Pixar was looking to negotiate better terms with another distribution partner. Could Disney risk losing them?

Mergers & acquisitions

Professional Essays Writer Honda (B)

Evelyn T. Christiansen, Richard Tanner Pascale

Strategy & Execution

Describes the history of Honda Motor Company from its beginning through its entry into and subsequent dominance of the U.S. market as seen through the eyes of Honda executives. The history of Honda’s successful entry into the U.S. market is viewed as highly adaptive and fraught with error and serendipity. Honda (A) and (B) are designed to be used together to contrast two differing views of major events in a company’s history, both of which are important for a general manager to understand.

Change management, Competitive strategy, Corporate governance, Managing people

Professional Essays Writer Honda (A)

Evelyn T. Christiansen, Richard Tanner Pascale

Strategy & Execution

Describes the history of Honda Motor Company from its beginning through its entry into and subsequent dominance of the U.S. market. The history is explained primarily in terms of strategic factors and quoted from two sources: an earlier case and Boston Consulting Group report on the motorcycle industry. Should be used with Honda (B).

Competition, Competitive strategy, Corporate governance, Manufacturing