Professional Essays Writer Comcast Corporation

Sunil Gupta, Henry McGee, Felix Oberholzer-Gee, Margaret Rodriguez

Strategy & Execution

In March 2015, the U.S. television industry received a major wake-up call. HBO, a premium cable channel with over 30 million subscribers, had announced it would begin offering a standalone streaming service. This new service would allow customers to bypass the cable companies and get direct access to HBO’s programming online. The announcement was followed closely by Brian Roberts, chief executive of the Comcast Corporation. Comcast was America’s largest cable and internet service provider, having built a profitable business bundling television content and delivering it via cable networks to more than 20 million households. Broadcast and cable television was a $173 billion industry in the U.S., but the rise of on-demand and streaming services meant viewers had more options than ever before. What did developments such as HBO’s new service mean for the future of Comcast, and for the industry overall?

Professional Essays Writer The Rise and Fall of Nokia

Juan Alcacer, Tarun Khanna, Christine Snively

Strategy & Execution

In 2013, Nokia sold its Device and Services business to Microsoft for €5.4 billion. For decades Nokia had led the telecommunications (telecom) industry in handsets and networking. By the late 2000s, however, Nokia’s position as market leader in mobile devices was threatened by competition from new lower-cost Asian manufacturers. Apple’s 2007 release of its iPhone established an entire new category-the smartphone-immediately popular with users. What were Nokia’s missteps over the years? What should Nokia have done differently?

Mobile, Strategy

Professional Essays Writer Henkel: Building a Winning Culture

Robert L. Simons, Natalie Kindred

Finance & Accounting

This case illustrates a CEO-led organizational transformation driven by stretch goals, performance measurement , and accountability. When Kasper Rorsted became CEO of Henkel, a Germany-based producer of personal care, laundry, and adhesives products, in 2008, he was determined to transform a corporate culture of “good enough” into one singularly focused on winning in a competitive marketplace. Historically, Henkel was a comfortable, stable place to work. Many employees never received negative performance feedback. Seeking to overturn a pervasive attitude of complacency, Rorsted implemented a multi-step change initiative aimed at building a “winning culture.” First, in November 2008, he announced a set of ambitious financial targets for 2012. As financial turmoil roiled the global economy, he reaffirmed his commitment to these targets, sending a clear signal to Henkel employees and external stakeholders that excuses were no longer acceptable. Rorsted next introduced a new set of five company values-replacing the previous list of 10 values, which few employees could recite by memory-the first of which emphasized a focus on customers. He also instituted a new, simplified performance management system, which rated managers’ performance and advancement potential on a four-point scale. The system also included a forced ranking requirement, mandating that a defined percentage of employees (in each business unit and company-wide) be ranked as top, strong, moderate, or low performers. These ratings significantly impacted managers’ bonus compensation. In late 2011-the time in which the case takes place-Henkel is well on its way to achieving its 2012 targets. Having shed nearly half its top management team, along with numerous product sites and brands, Henkel appears to be a leaner, more competitive, “winning” organization.

Change management, Collaboration, Executive compensation, Financial analysis, Organizational culture, Performance measurement, Personnel policies, Social responsibility, Strategy execution, Work-life balance

Professional Essays Writer Regarding NAFTA

Elizabeth B. Stein, Debora L. Spar

Global Business

In the aftermath of World War II, the countries of the industrialized world engaged in an unprecedented round of institution-building, through which historical barriers to international trade, especially tariffs, came tumbling down. The GATT has reshaped the environment of world trade to such an extent that international trade flows have exploded. Even as global trade has become more integrated, however, a second round of institutions, regional rather than global, has emerged. The most recent and largest of the major regional institutions, NAFTA, was signed on December 17, 1992, and took effect in early 1994. This case examines the effect of this radically new institutional context on three different firms, each representing a different industry and country.

International business

Professional Essays Writer Amazon in 2016

Sunil Gupta

Sales & Marketing

By 2015, Amazon had become one of the world’s largest e-commerce players with nearly $90 billion in annual sales. Although its profitability had been uneven in the 20 years since its inception, its stock price had risen almost 24,000% since the company went public. During this time Amazon has spread its business across a variety of products and services that some see as unrelated. Was Amazon spreading itself too thin or were its investments positioning the company for the future?

Marketing, Technology

Professional Essays Writer Power and Influence: Achieving Your Objectives in Organizations

Elizabeth Long Lingo, Kathleen L. McGinn

Leadership & Managing People

Power is the potential to mobilize energy. This rather neutral definition does not address the issues of how to exercise power or to what ends. The answers to these questions determine the ultimate value of an individual’s power. This note is written to help readers analyze the social system in which their power exists and their influence will be used. Following the guidelines presented, a careful analysis of the social system in which an individual operates, and an assessment of that individual’s desires and objectives within the social system, may help maximize the development of power and the effective use of influence.

Networking

Professional Essays Writer Dream Big Academy Charter School (A)

Liz Livingston Howard, Matthew Shaw

Leadership & Managing People

This case examines the leadership challenges associated with budget shortfalls in a young nonprofit organization. The school leader must decide how to close the budget gap and implement the decision. Case A focuses on the decision-making process and the associated communication between the school leaders and the teaching staff. The staff is dissatisfied with the decision and writes a letter of complaint to the Board of Directors. Case B focuses on the Board of Directors’ reaction to the letter and the situation’s resolution.

Leadership, Social enterprise, Strategy

Professional Essays Writer Procter & Gamble: Marketing Capabilities

Rebecca Henderson, Ryan Johnson

Sales & Marketing

P&G had become known and recognized as a marketing machine. It was the largest advertiser in the world, with 2010 spending of $8.68 billion. From the company’s early exploitation of broadcast media (radio and television) for its soap products to more recent experiments in digital media for its men’s hygiene brand Old Spice, P&G was a seasoned marketer with strong consumer research, a powerful innovation network, and the world’s largest financial commitment to advertising.

Competitive strategy, Innovation, International business, Market research

Professional Essays Writer Paul Levy: Taking Charge of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (A)

David A. Garvin, Michael A. Roberto

Leadership & Managing People

On January 7, 2002, Paul Levy became CEO of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a troubled organization, in serious financial difficulty. This case describes the situation Levy inherited, his negotiations prior to taking the job, and his first six months as CEO.

Communication, Corporate governance, Decision making, Leadership, Managing people

Professional Essays Writer Cleveland Clinic: Transformation and Growth 2015

Michael E. Porter, Elizabeth Olmsted Teisberg

Strategy & Execution

The Cleveland Clinic’s health care services are internationally renowned for quality. In 2008, The Clinic began to restructure the organization into teams defined around patient needs, rather than traditional medical specialties.”Patients First! takes shape as the teams measure and report outcomes, coordinate care, and develop to support improving value for patients. In addition to restructuring care delivery in the hospitals and throughout northeastern Ohio, The Clinic has investments, facilities, and staff in several other states in the U.S. as well as in Canada and Abu Dhabi. Now in 2015, as the Clinic’s domestic and international footprint continues to expand, its leadership is also focused in maintaining the Cleveland Clinic brand and providing optimal clinical care. Students can explore strategy transformation, geographic expansion, the process of introducing new measurement approaches, alignment of activities with strategic goals, and issues in leading change both within a company and across an economic sector.

Growth strategy, Health, Leadership, Performance measurement, Personnel policies